Fellowship Presentations: 5 Thoughts

With the cancellation of lectures and classes at the University of Cape Town at this time, please note that the 5 Thoughts event scheduled for Sunday, September 18th, has been postponed until further notice.

ICA is pleased to announce 5 THOUGHTS, an afternoon programme of dynamic and interactive fellow presentations. Awarded to creative thinkers and doers in diverse disciplines, ICA fellowships encourage collaborative dialogue around issues of urbanism, community, historical legacy and the postcolonial imaginary. Fellows are encouraged to test boundaries, engage with new publics, and to explore the critical potentialities of live art.

5 THOUGHTS brings together five of the fourteen 2016 ICA fellows, who will present and invite discussion around their creative research projects. The fellows present research on performance, film, poetry, curation and dance. As a public programme all are welcome to attend and participate. Refreshments will be served.

 

PROGRAMME DETAILS:

H I D D I N G H   H A L L   :   1 6 : 0 0

 

/ SIHLE HLOPHE: Lobola, a bride’s true price – trailer screening and project discussion

 

In Lobola, a bride’s true price, feminist filmmaker Sihle Hlophe will be turning the camera on herself, and sharing her journey to becoming a married woman. Through her unique perspective as someone who is both ‘westernised’ yet deeply rooted in African identity, Hlophe unpacks the notion of bride price in a way that can only be done by someone with extremely close proximity to the subject matter. She writes, “Vacillating between the scientifically sound written history of the West and the oral history of my elders, the documentary will navigate numerous ethical and cultural landmines, challenging feminist beliefs about marriage as well as my identity as a South African woman of Bantu descent”.

 

/ GENNA GARDINI: MS Independent: Diagnosis

 

Poet and playwright Genna Gardini will present from a series of writing workshops she has been conducting in collaboration with ICA, which centre on experiences of diagnosis. This presentation occurs within the broader context of her current project, MS Independent: Diagnosis. In this, poetry and performance writing are used to explore experiences of being diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis, as registered by a group of womxn and LGBTQIAP+ South Africans, including Gardini.

 

/ THALIA LARIC: Dance Improvisation demonstration

 

‘Open Score’ refers to the moment in an improvisation when the structure that guides the order of events softens to open up possibilities for the unknown. This is a concept familiar in both Contact Improvisation and Dance Improvisation Performance. Thalia Laric will briefly discuss these two practices and how they inform her performance research and teaching practice. This will be followed by a 10 minute Dance Improvisation Performance in which real-time compositional decisions are made by five dancers and one musician.

 

/ NALA XABA: Fugitive Publics: an Open Space

 

Curator Nala Xaba will be hosting an Open Space discussion during which art practitioners, will share of their experiences of creative production within (and places of refuge without) varied arts institutions, before turning to facilitate breakaway group discussions – around the oppression-politics of the art centre and collective imaginings of socially justified, anticolonial practice through it.

 

Open Space is centred on the principle of self-organisation. This system of group discussion/ common creation strives to reject any requirement of “normative productivity” in favour of questions for their own sake. The agenda is never preset but rather co-created by those gathered around a shared curiosity, a mutual agitation. Participants are free (read, encouraged) to move between the simultaneous conversations with questions and knowledge offerings.

 

T H E   P L A Y R O O M : 1 7 : 4 5

/ ALAN PARKER: Detritus for one

Choreographed and performed by Alan Parker, design by Gavin Krastin.

This presentation and discussion forms the basis for Parker’s fellowship. Described as “evanescent” (Critter) and “one of the genre’s highlights” (Cape Times) at the 2015 National Arts Festival, Detritus for One is a Standard Bank Ovation Award winning production that playfully and poignantly explores the relationship between performance and the traces left in the memory once it has ended.

 

5 THOUGHTS

SUNDAY 18th SEPTEMBER

PROGRAMME STARTS AT 16:00 refreshments will be served

 

HIDDINGH HALL & THE BINDERY

UCT HIDDINGH CAMPUS, 31-37 ORANGE STREET, GARDENS CAPE TOWN 8001

FREE PARKING, ALL ARE WELCOME

For seating and catering purposes, please RSVP ica@uct.ac.za

Great Texts – Imraan Coovadia

As part of its Great Texts/Big Questions lecture series, the Institute for Creative Arts (ICA, formerly GIPCA) presents award-winning novelist, Imraan Coovadia.

Coovadia will present Nelson Mandela and the Arts in which he asks: What do politicians learn from the arts? What do they see reflected in the novel? Why was Nelson Mandela interested in the novel and how did he show himself in his choice of stage roles? What is the nature of Mandela’s famous high-mindedness and grace and how do we understand his identification with Tolstoy’s character Kutuzov from War and Peace?

Imraan Coovadia is a renowned novelist, essayist, and academic. Born in Durban, Coovadia has lived in London, Melbourne and New York. He is currently based in Cape Town where he is professor in the English Department at UCT, and Director of the Creative Writing Programme. Coovadia is the author of several novels, including High Low In-between (Sunday Times Fiction Prize in 2010, and the University of Johannesburg Prize) as well as a collection of essays, Transformations (2012). His latest novel, Tales of the Metric System, was published in 2014.

The event will take place from 17:30 – 19:00 on Tuesday 23 August 2016 at the Anatomy Lecture Theatre, Old Medical School Building, UCT Hiddingh Campus, 31 – 37 Orange Street, Cape Town. Refreshments will be served from 17:00. No booking is necessary and all are welcome.

For more information, contact the ICA office: +27 21 650 7156 or ica@uct.ac.za

Great Texts – Nelson Maldonado-Torres

As part of its Great Texts/Big Questions lecture series, the Institute for Creative Arts (ICA, formerly GIPCA) presents Rutgers University academic, Nelson Maldonado-Torres.

Maldonado-Torres will present Ten Theses on Coloniality and Decoloniality in which he explores colonization and decolonization; coloniality and decoloniality – key terms in movements that challenge the predominant racial, sexist, homo and trans-phobic liberal and neoliberal politics of today. While colonization was supposed to be a matter of the past, increasingly, movements and independent intellectuals, artists, and activists see the presence of coloniality everywhere. These ten theses aim to provide a basic conceptual infrastructure for addressing coloniality and decoloniality beyond historicist reductionisms.

Nelson Maldonado-Torres is Associate Professor in the Department of Latino and Caribbean Studies and the Comparative Literature Programme at Rutgers University, as well as Research Fellow in the Department of Political Sciences at the University of South Africa. His research interests include ethnic studies, Africana philosophy, and decolonial thought. Maldonado-Torres was President of the Caribbean Philosophical Association (2008-2013), and Director of the Center for Latino Policy Research at the University of California, Berkeley (2009-2010).

He is currently working on two book-length projects: Fanonian Meditations, which aims to spell out the epistemological basis of “ethnic studies” and related areas, as well as examine the relevance of decolonization at the epistemological, ethical, and political levels; and Theorizing the Decolonial Turn which provides a historical and theoretical overview of the “decolonial turn”.

The lecture, followed by an open question and answer session, will take place from 17:30 – 19:00 on Monday 22 August 2016 in the Anatomy Lecture Theatre, Old Medical School Building, UCT Hiddingh Campus, 31 – 37 Orange Street, Cape Town. Refreshments will be served from 17:00. No booking is necessary and all are welcome.

For more information, contact the ICA office: +27 21 650 7156 or ica@uct.ac.za

Listen to the podcast here.

Great Texts – MAMAZA

As part of its Great Texts/Big Questions lecture series, the Institute for Creative Arts (ICA, formerly GIPCA) presents Eifo Efi – a performance by Ioannis Mandafounis & Fabrice Mazliah of the choreographic collective, MAMAZA.

In Eifo Efi, Mandafounis & Mazliah offer their understanding of two persons, as the “more than” of what two people can be. The performers fill the space with versions and echoes of themselves. While only two bodies appear, reflective elements and diverting strategies enhance the visual to stimulate the sensory, making the “just two” reveal the presence of others.

Emerging from a body of choreographic work that explores the perception of appearances and the production of visual paradox, Eifo Efi names the urge to speak specifically from within theatrical constructs, and to find new modes of intertwining the experience of the audience with that of the performers.

Following the 55 min performance, Mandafounis and Mazliah will be in conversation with Director of the ICA, Jay Pather.

MAMAZA is a choreographic structure in which choreographic work is explored, developed and produced through acts of creation and transmission. The company was founded by Ioannis Mandafounis, Fabrice Mazliah and May Zarhy in 2009 and has since evolved into a dynamic structure, opening up new collaborations with each new project. MAMAZA tours internationally with various shows and installations and gives workshops on choreography, improvisation and research. For more information about MAMAZA’s works visit: www.mamaza.net

This performance of Eifo Efi is supported by Pro Helvetia Johannesburg, the Swiss Arts Council.

The event will take place from 18:00 – 20:00 on Saturday 20 August 2016 at Hiddingh Hall, UCT Hiddingh Campus, 31 – 37 Orange Street, Cape Town. Refreshments will be served from 17:30. No booking is necessary and all are welcome.

For more information, contact the ICA office: +27 21 650 7156 or ica@uct.ac.za

Eifo Efi credits:
Concept / choreography / dance: Ioannis Mandafounis, Fabrice Mazliah
Dramaturgical support: Liz Waterhouse, David Kern
Technical director: Harry Schulz
Production management: Johanna Milz
Production: MAMAZA
A coproduction of: Künstlerhaus Mousonturm, The Forsythe Company, kunstenfestivaldesarts, PACT Zollverein Essen.
Funded by: the Fonds Doppelpass of the German Federal Cultural Foundation.
Supported by: Pro Helvetia, the Swiss Arts Council.

[Photo credit: Eifo Efi; photographer: Dominik Mentzos; dancers: Ioannis Mandafounis, Fabrice Mazliah]

ICA announces recipients of the 2016 Fellowship program.

The Institute for Creative Arts (ICA) is pleased to introduce its international, national, live art and curatorial fellows for 2016. Awarded to creative thinkers and doers in diverse disciplines, ICA fellowships encourage collaborative dialogue around issues of urbanism, community, historical legacy and the postcolonial imaginary.

Fellows are encouraged to test boundaries, engage with new publics, and to explore the critical potentialities of live art. We are particularly excited about the diverse contributions and imaginative ways of thinking presented by this year’s fellows – from performative writing, dance and music, to art, curatorship and interdisciplinary research. Conversations, exhibitions and public interventions presented by fellows will be announced in due course.

International fellowships have been granted to Roxanne Campbell, Andrew Hennlich, Felicia Mings and Meghna Singh. National fellowships have granted to Genna Gardini, Sihle Hlophe, Robert Machiri, Memory Biwa and Amie Soudien. Curatorial fellowships have been granted to Chandra Frank and Thembinkosi Goniwe. Live Art fellowships have been granted to Euridice Kala, Thalia Laric, Zanele Muholi, Alan Parker and Nala Xaba.

ICA International Fellows:

Roxanne Campbell (Jamaica/United States)

Roxanne R Campbell is a visual artist, born in Kingston, Jamaica, and raised in Brooklyn, New York. Campbell has a MFA in Experimental and Documentary Arts from Duke University and a Bachelor of Arts in Studio Art, concentration cinematography, from the University of Virginia. Her documentary work is often observational and explores the representation of African and Afro-Caribbean culture and identity, by counter-framing accepted narratives of the African Diaspora in the Americas. Her project Color Bar, is an interview-driven documentary project that examines concepts of race and masculinity in relation to Black identity – in particular, labels and stereotypes associated with skin tone.

Andrew Hennlich (United States)

Andrew Hennlich is Assistant Professor of Art History at Western Michigan University.  Hennlich will research Athi-Patra Ruga’s Future White Women of Azania, considering Ruga’s performances and tapestry through Walter Benjamin’s work on collective dream images of mass culture and the critical function of art.  By bringing Benjamin and Ruga’s work together he will explore how Ruga draws connections between Holocaust and apartheid memory in public space, offering an avenue to awaken to new models of social transformation in post-apartheid South Africa.

Felicia Mings (Canada/United States)

Felicia Mings is a Canadian-born and US-based independent curator and arts educator. She is also the inaugural Coordinator of the Andrew W. Mellon Summer Academy and Undergraduate Curatorial Fellowship Program at the Art Institute of Chicago. Felicia’s work at the Art Institute has spurred her interest in curricular models for diversity in curatorial practice. As a result her current research aims to refine new and effective modes for curatorial training. 

Meghna Singh (India/South Africa)

Meghna Singh is a visual artist and researcher. Hailing from New Delhi, she is currently pursuing art practice and a doctoral research at the University of Cape Town. Taking the memory and site of the Portugese slave ship, San Jose paquette de Africa, that sank in Cape Town on the 27th December 1794 with 212 slaves from Mozambique, the project engages with the politics of invisible populations that sail across oceans. Drawing on the history of transported black bodies, her work is about the circulation of human lives and things at sea within the framework of historical and contemporary trade routes and economies of exchange from East Africa to Brazil and Portugal.

ICA National Fellows:

Genna Gardini (South Africa)

Genna Gardini is a writer based in Cape Town. She has won multiple awards for her work as a poet and playwright, including the DALRO New Coin Poetry Prize. Gardini is a co-founder of Horses’ Heads Productions and member of PlayRiot, the South African playwrights collective. She holds an MA in Theatre-making (Playwriting) from UCT and is currently a lecturer at CityVarsity. Matric Rage, published by uHlanga, is Gardini’s debut poetry collection. Her current project, MS Independent: Diagnosis uses poetry and performance writing to explore experiences of being diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis, as registered by a group of womxn and LGBTQIAP+ South Africans, including Gardini.

Sihle Hlophe (South Africa)

Sihle Hlophe is a talented scriptwriter, director and entrepreneur who holds a MA in Communication Studies. Her work has been broadcast on SABC, eTV and DSTV and screened as far afield as Switzerland, Tanzania, Finland and the USA. Hlophe’s current project, Lobola, A Bride’s True Price is a 80 minute documentary that challenges the heteronormative notion of ‘lobola/bride’s price’ by retracing the roots of the Bantu people of Southern Africa. The marriage of symbolism, satirical images of ‘deep dark Africa’, archival material and stop frame animation complement the films’ deeply personal video diary style.

Robert Machiri and Memory Biwa (Zimbabwe and Namibia)

Robert Machiri, also known as Chi, is a Zimbabwean multidisciplinary artist and curator. His project, Pungwe Nights, is a participatory public platform which hosts African music with related contemporary arts.

Memory Biwa is a historian who researches and writes on the afterlives of genocide in Namibia, combining anthropology, performance and sound studies.

Listening at Pungwe Nights explores the relationship between the sound of language and the language of sound. Collaborating on the project, Machiri and Biwa reimagine the dialectic relationship between recording, translation and the recyclability of transnational phonographic cultures. The overall composition of the work will gather its form through experiential performance, as a live remix at a pungwe, or wake, and as an unbounded sonic exploration of khoekhoegowab orature and mbira tongues.

Amie LH Soudien (South Africa)

Amie LH Soudien is an arts journalist and artist from Cape Town. Soudien completed her BAFA at Michaelis School of Fine Art in 2013, and completed her MA in New Arts Journalism at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 2016. Her current interests include postcolonial studies, popular media, and emerging artists from Africa and the diaspora. With ICA, Soudien will present a series of walking tours of the Cape Town CBD centered on the city’s untold early colonial history. The tour series will focus exclusively on women and the narratives of slaves, indigenous people, and colonial subjects. 

ICA Curatorial Fellows:

Chandra Frank (Netherlands/South Africa)

Chandra Frank is an independent curator and PhD Candidate at Goldsmiths, University of London. Her research is focused on Black and brown feminist and queer genealogies, the role of archives and deepening our understanding of intimacy and pleasure.  She will be exploring how the archive may be refigured in the exhibition space, and how the transnational exchange of bodies and text offers new perspectives on queer intimacy that may transcend archival violence. Frank will explore the changing role of the curator and discuss how and where her own body and subjectivity enters the exhibition-making process, and how the creation of new archives is inherently a communal and transformative one.

Thembinkosi Goniwe (South Africa)

Currently a visiting researcher at the Wits School of Arts, Thembinkosi Goniwe is an artist and art historian whose curatorial fellowship will reimagine Ernest Mancoba’s Bantu Madonna through performative and collaborative works of art. Significant to the project is the notion of performing the text, as different mediums, strategies, modes, disciplines and registers are explored as intersectional performances – reading, analysing, revisiting and reimagining a seminal artwork by a pioneering artist in the history of South African visual art.

ICA Live Art Fellows:

Euridice Kala (Mozambique)

Based in Maputo, Euridice Getulio Kala is a Mozambican artist interested in historical cultural metamorphoses, manipulations and adaptations, and the ways these resonate within contemporary contexts. To be presentaed at the 2016 ICA Live Art Festival, her forthcoming performance will include material and sounds gathered from between Ilha de Moçambique (Mozambique) and Cape Town (South Africa), presenting these as points of encounter between the Indian and Atlantic Oceans. The performance forms part of a broader research and artistic project, Sea (e) Scapes, which seeks to generate discourse by negotiating space and shared narratives – expanding and including Indian Ocean possibilities.

Thalia Laric (South Africa)

Thalia Laric is one of the leading teachers of Contact Improvisation in Cape Town. Her project proposes research related to the performance of contact-based improvisations – in particular the development of compositional awareness practice within an improvisational dance form that is at once social, kinaesthetic and performative. Thalia holds a Master’s degree in Choreography from Rhodes University and has performed with the First Physical Theatre Company. She is a founding member and director of the award winning collective, Underground Dance Theatre.

Zanele Muholi (South Africa)

Zanele Muholi is a photographer and activist whose self-proclaimed mission is ‘to re-write a black queer and trans visual history of South Africa for the world to know of our resistance and existence at the height of hate crimes in SA and beyond’. In 2002 she co-founded the Forum for Empowerment of Women (FEW), and in 2009 founded Inkanyiso, a forum for queer and visual (activist) media. Extending her existing photographic project, Somnyama Ngonyama, she has invited a selection of artists, poets and musicians to interpret and perform the images, which focus on different queer/transphobic and racist incidents that continue to take place in South Africa and other countries.

Alan Parker (South Africa)

Alan Parker is a Cape Town-based choreographer, performer and teacher, currently engaged in doctoral research at the University of Cape Town, where he also lectures in the School of Dance, the Department of Drama and the College of Music. Parker’s PhD research considers the relationship between the live arts and the archive, with a specific focus on choreographic strategies aimed at performing the archive. His current performance project, ‘ma’, takes its inspiration from past dances about death, where the resurrection of the dead through dance performance is likened to the archival act of performance reconstruction.

Nala Xaba (South Africa)

Nala Xaba is a curator, dancer and visual artist from Johannesburg, living and working in Cape Town. Her interdisciplinary research is a decolonialist interrogation of how art centres and residencies, which position themselves as intermediaries between artists and funders, influence the work of (especially cis- and trans womxn and non-binary) artists.  She hopes to move towards a theory of socially justified institutional practice, which undermines the psychologically and epistemically violent ‘–isms’ of exclusion and dehumanization.

Great Texts – Grace A. Musila

As part of its Great Texts/Big Questions lecture series, the Institute for Creative Arts (ICA, formerly GIPCA) presents Stellenbosch University academic, Grace A. Musila.

Musila will present A Death Retold in Truth and Rumour: Kenya, Britain and the Julie Ward Murder.

Julie Ward was a 28-year old British tourist who travelled to Kenya in 1988. After a few months in Nairobi, she drove to the Maasai Mara Game Reserve to photograph the annual wildebeest migration from the Serengeti National Park into Maasai Mara. On 6 September 1988, she was reported missing and six days later, her partly burnt remains were found in the game reserve.

Based on Musila’s book of the same title, this lecture explores readings of and inscriptions on Julie Ward’s life and death as important windows into British and Kenyan imaginaries on a wide range of issues – including race relations in postcolonial Africa; perceptions of female sexual moralities; the workings of state power and transnational capital, among other issues.

Read an interview with Musila here: https://boydellandbrewer.com/jc-african-griot-a-death-retold-in-truth-and-rumour.

Grace A. Musila is Associate Professor in the English Department at Stellenbosch University, and a fellow at the Stellenbosch Institute for Advanced Studies (STIAS). Her research interests include Gender Studies, Eastern and Southern African literatures and African popular culture.

The lecture, followed by an open question and answer session, will take place from 17:30 – 19:00 on Tuesday 16 August 2016 at the Anatomy Lecture Theatre, Old Medical School Building, UCT Hiddingh Campus, 31 – 37 Orange Street, Cape Town.

Musila’s book, A Death Retold in Truth and Rumour: Kenya, Britain and the Julie Ward Murder will be on sale at the lecture.

Refreshments will be served from 17:00. No booking is necessary and all are welcome.

For more information, contact the ICA office: +27 21 650 7156 or ica@uct.ac.za

Great Texts – Jyoti Mistry & Jacki McInnes

As part of its Great Texts/Big Questions lecture series, the Institute for Creative Arts (ICA, formerly GIPCA) presents curators Jyoti Mistry & Jacki McInnes.

The curators will reflect on the conceptual undertaking of the exhibition When Tomorrow Comes – showing at Michaelis Galleries from 4 August to 9 September – that provides interpretations of the apocalypse, the end of times and its visual expressions. While the exhibition includes some international artists, it focuses particularly on what an ‘Armageddon’ might mean in a South African context.

The lecture will be followed by walkabout of the exhibition conducted by the curators.

Jyoti Mistry is a filmmaker and Associate Professor at the Wits School of Arts. She has been guest professor at institutions in Addis Abba, Amsterdam, Berlin, New York and Vienna. She has published widely on the topics of multiculturalism, identity politics, race and memory.

Jacki McInnes is an independent arts practitioner who has practiced variously as artist, arts writer and curator since obtaining her (BA)FA with distinction from UNISA in 2001. She won the UNISA Fine Art Faculty Medal in the same year and went on to complete an MFA at Michaelis School of Fine Art in 2004.

The lecture will take place from 17:30 – 18:15 on Thursday 11 August 2016 at Hiddingh Hall, UCT Hiddingh Campus, 31 – 37 Orange Street, Cape Town. The walkabout will follow immediately thereafter, from 18:15 – 19:00 at Michaelis Galleries.

Refreshments will be served from 17:00. No booking is necessary and all are welcome.

For more information, contact the ICA office: +27 21 650 7156 or ica@uct.ac.za

About the exhibition:
When tomorrow comes brings together a range of preeminent South African and international artists to engage with ‘apocalypticism’ – confronting the orthodoxy of ‘end times’ and thinking beyond it to forms of survival, regeneration and rebirth. Participating artists include Willem Boshoff, Steven Cohen, Marianne Halter & Mario Marchisella, Volker März, Jacki McInnes, Jyoti Mistry, Mohau Modisakeng, Moffat Takadiwa and Diane Victor. The exhibition is curated by Michael Titlestad, Jacki McInnes, and Jyoti Mistry.

Great Texts – Robert Bernasconi

As part of its Great Texts/Big Questions lecture series, the Institute for Creative Arts (ICA, formerly GIPCA) presents Pennsylvania State University professor, Robert Bernasconi.

Bernasconi will present Why Do We Think About Racism As We Do? a critical examination of the dominant approach to racism since the 1950 UNESCO Statement on Race. The tendency within the mainstream has been to think of racism as parasitic on the concept of race in the expectation that scientific challenges to the concept of race make racism untenable. By returning to the work of Fanon, Biko, and Sartre, Bernasconi outlines an alternative approach.

Robert Bernasconi is Edwin Erle Sparks Professor of Philosophy and African American Studies at Pennsylvania State University. His research and teaching interests lie in critical philosophy of race, particularly in relation to the history of philosophy, and Continental philosophy. Bernasconi is the author of How to Read SartreHeidegger in Question: The Art of Existing, and The Question of Language in Heidegger’s History of Being. He is the editor of the journal Critical Philosophy of Race.

The lecture, followed by an open question and answer session, will take place from 17:30 – 19:00 on Thursday 4 August 2016 at Hiddingh Hall, UCT Hiddingh Campus, 31 – 37 Orange Street, Cape Town. Refreshments will be served from 17:00. No booking is necessary and all are welcome.

Listen to the podcast here.

For more information, contact the ICA office: +27 21 650 7156 or ica@uct.ac.za

Great Texts – Sindiwe Magona

As part of its Great Texts/Big Questions lecture series, the Institute for Creative Arts (ICA, formerly GIPCA) presents legendary South African author, Sindiwe Magona.

Magona will present The Writer and Her Times, in which she asks: Who is the writer and what is she to the nation? What determines the writer’s themes? What is the role of her community, and her role in that community? What is her role in the life of the nation?

Sindiwe Magona is a prolific writer, poet, dramatist, storyteller, actress and motivational speaker. She has published a number of internationally acclaimed works, including Beauty’s Gift; Living, Loving, and Lying Awake at Night and To My Children’s Children. Her latest novel, Chasing the Tails of My Father’s Cattle was published in November 2015. Magona was awarded the Presidential Order of Ikhamanga (2011) in recognition of her literary and humanitarian contribution, and the 2016 English Academy of Southern Africa gold medal award for distinguished service to English over a lifetime. Her play, OoMasisulu will be showing at Artscape from 3 – 13 August after a successful run at this year’s Grahamstown Arts Festival.

The lecture, followed by an open question and answer session, will take place from 17:30 – 19:00 on Tuesday 2 August 2016 at Hiddingh Hall, UCT Hiddingh Campus, 31 – 37 Orange Street, Cape Town. Refreshments will be served from 17:00. No booking is necessary and all are welcome.

For more information, contact the ICA office: +27 21 650 7156 or ica@uct.ac.za

Listen to the podcast here.

Music in the City – Madosini

Any Given Sunday, in association with Straight No Chaser Jazz Club and the Institute for Creative Arts, hosts the legendary Madosini in a concert that offers the public an exceptional opportunity to experience musical treasures from ancient pasts. This Music in the City Concert, Bow Conversations, takes place on Saturday 23 July at Hiddingh Hall. The “queen of indigenous music”, as she is also known, is a unique access to an indigenous Southern African musical tradition that is all but extinct.

“Nowadays the traditions we lived by are dying and people are no longer telling stories and making music. I try my best to keep it all alive.” – Madosini

The iconic Xhosa composer, singer, story-teller and multi-instrumentalist shares some of her retro-futuristic compositions for uhadi (bow), umrhubhe (mouthbow) and isitolotolo (jaw harp) with Mpho Molikeng (Kudu horns, saxophone) and Nothembele ‘Vuma’ Maka (bows).

The event also features special guest cameos from multi-instrumental maverick Hilton Schilder (mouthbow, melodica), award-winning percussionist Dizu Plaatjies and Glen Ahrendse (mouthbow) in what promises to be a truly fascinating conversation at a place where bow roots and beat routes merge to create new improvisational conversations. Audiences with open ears can expect to transcend contemporary society’s entertainment impulse to achieve a cosmological state of inner-tainment through communion with the ancestors.

ABOUT THE ARTIST

Born Latozi Madosini Manqina in 1922 (according to her official identity document) in a village called Mqhekezweni outside Umtata in the Eastern Cape province, Madosini is a South African musician, known for playing traditional instruments such as the uhadi and mhrubhe musical bows, and the isitolotolo. She is regarded as ‘a national treasure’. Madosini speaks only isiXhosa and is unable to read or write. In 2008, Madosini performed at the WOMAD festival, and was the first person to be recorded and documented in the festival’s Musical Elders Archives project. In 2013 she was awarded the Arts & Culture Trust Lifetime Achievement Award for Music, with the support of the Southern African Music Rights Organisation (SAMRO), in recognition of her contribution to the country’s musical heritage.

[Photo: Madosini with her Uhadi bow; courtesy of Wikimedia Commons]

The performance will take place 17h30 for 18h00 on Saturday 23 July 2016 at Hiddingh Hall, UCT Hiddingh Campus, 31-37 Orange Street, Cape Town. A cash bar will be available from 17h30.  No booking is necessary and all are welcome.

For more information, contact the ICA office: +27 21 650 7156 or ica@uct.ac.za

Additional performances:

This Music in the City concert forms part of the Any Given Sunday series. Two additional performances will take place as follows:

  • Friday, 22 July: Moholo Live House, 42 Ncumo Road, Harare Square, Harare, Khayelitsha. 20:00. Tel. 073 940 1556 and
  • Sunday, 24 July: Straight No Chaser Jazz Club at The Drawing Room, 87 Station Road, Observatory. Sets at 18:30 and 20:00. Booking recommended. Tel. 076 679 2697

About ICA

The Institute for Creative Arts (ICA) is an interdisciplinary institute in the University of Cape Town’s Humanities Faculty – formerly the Gordon Institute for Performing and Creative Arts (GIPCA).  The ICA facilitates research projects in the creative and performing arts that disrupt boundaries, while underscoring creative education and practice across discipline and faculty. Interdisciplinarity, Live Art and Public Spheres are key themes of the Institute, and projects are imbued with innovation, collaboration and a dialogue with urbanism and community.

About Any Given Sunday

Any Given Sunday, curated by Riason Naidoo, Jay Pather and Richard Pithouse, is the Cape Town leg of Draft, a yearlong project anchored in nine interdisciplinary collaboratives—Beijing, Cairo, Cape Town, Hamburg, Hong Kong, Mexico City, Mumbai, St. Petersburg and Zurich—which collectively consider contemporary art that produces, provokes and contributes to critical public debates.

Participating artists are Burning Museum, Hasan and Husain Essop, Gabrielle Goliath, Gerald Machona, Sethembile Msezane, Zanele Muholi, Koleka Putuma and Buhlebezwe Siwani. The Madosini concerts conclude the series of multidisciplinary artistic events comprising the public art project. For further information, please visit Facebook.

Great Texts – Gayatri Spivak

As part of its Great Texts/Big Questions lecture series, the Institute for Creative Arts (ICA, formerly GIPCA), in collaboration with UCT’s Black Academic Caucus (BAC), presents internationally acclaimed academic, poststructuralist theorist and feminist critic, Gayatri Spivak.

Of her address, entitled Still hoping for a revolution, Spivak writes:

Now that the first wave of “revolution” against decrepit empires, leading to state capitalism and vanguardism, is showing its deep fault lines, I reopen the question of Marx’s real project and focus on holistic education into citizenship – as the conjuncture has moved from the central agency of the industrial proletariat – as a robust substitute for both vanguardism and techniques of pre-party formation.

This is particularly interesting for me because I have myself learned from many mistakes made since 1992, when I presented the T.B. Davie Memorial Lecture in Cape Town on “Thinking Academic Freedom in Gendered Post-Coloniality.” The general response, as I heard it reported, was “we already do this.” Yet, in 2002, Joan Vincent included the piece in The Anthropology of Politics: A Reader in Ethnography, Theory, and Critique, commenting that I had been “prescient.” I therefore hope that my audience, which will be different, will also have learned from past “mistakes.”

Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak is a renowned theorist and professor of Comparative Literature at Columbia University where she founded the Institute for Comparative Literature and Society. Spivak first came to prominence with her translation of Derrida’s Of Grammatology (1976) and has since applied deconstructive readings to various theoretical engagements and textual analyses including feminism, Marxism, literary criticism and postcolonialism.

Her critical writings include Of Grammatology (1976), In Other Worlds: Essays in Cultural Politics (1987), The Post-Colonial Critic (1990), Thinking Academic Freedom in Gendered Post-Coloniality (1992), Outside in the Teaching Machine (1993), A Critique of Postcolonial Reason (1999), Death of a Discipline (2003), and Other Asias (2005).

The lecture, followed by an open question and answer session, will take place from 17:30 – 19:00 on Friday 22 July 2016 at Jameson Hall, University Avenue, University of Cape Town Upper Campus.

Refreshments will be served from 17:00. No booking is necessary and all are welcome.

For more information, contact the ICA office: +27 21 650 7156 or ica@uct.ac.za

Great Texts – Gerald Machona & Pak Ndjamena

As part of its Great Texts / Big Questions lecture series, the Institute for Creative Arts (ICA, formerly GIPCA) presents visual artist, Gerald Machona and Mozambican choreographer, Pak Ndjamena.

Machona and Ndjamena will present Influx – a performance-based installation that seeks to transform migratory objects and garments. Crucial to this artwork is an attempt to disrupt the 55 minute hour scheme used by Cape Town garment factories, where an assembly line of seamstresses and seamsters were governed by a clock that marked 55 minutes of production and 5 minutes of recess every hour. Rather than rely on a clock to keep time, the two artists draw rhythm from a sewing machine to stitch together dance and installation.

The movement of people across geographic and political borders is central to the discourse on migration, but often the capital, objects and ideas that people carry with them exist long after the act of moving. As these things ‘migrate’ they can be repeatedly transformed both in function and form. With this in mind, Influx as a performance work presents audiences with a new way of interrogating historical and contemporary movement. The performance will be followed by an address by curator, Nkule Mabaso that contextualises Influx.

Influx was first commissioned by Off Plan International, an interdisciplinary curatorial collective comprising Mary Corrigall, Amy Watson and Nelisiwe Xaba. This performance was first realised as part of Cape Town Artweek in 2016.

Gerald Machona is a Zimbabwean-born visual artist and PhD candidate at UCT. His current work engages with issues of migration, social interaction and xenophobia in South Africa. In 2015, Machona’s work featured at the South African Pavilion at the Venice Biennale in Italy, and was also showcased at the 2016 Biennale of Sydney.

Pak Ndjamena is a Mozambican dancer and choreographer, and founding member of Esculturas Humanas Contemporary Dance Company, created in 2002 in Maputo. His work has travelled to Portugal, Germany, London and other parts of the world.

Nkule Mabaso, 1988, is curator of the Michaelis Galleries at the Michaelis School of Fine Art, UCT.

The event will take place from 17:30 – 19:00 on Thursday 9 June 2016 at Hiddingh Hall, UCT Hiddingh Campus, 31 – 37 Orange Street, Cape Town. Refreshments will be served from 17:00. No booking is necessary and all are welcome.

This event is supported by an ANT Funding Grant from Pro Helvetia Johannesburg, financed by the Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation (SDC).

For more information, contact the ICA office: +27 21 650 7156 or sam.saevitzon@uct.ac.za

[Image credit: Gerald Machona - Influx still 2016, courtesy of the artist and Goodman Gallery]